RSS

Category Archives: Canadian whisky

Manhattan Sweet

Manhattan Sweet

Manhattan Sweet

February 25, 2016 – The Republic Steakhouse

Manhattan Sweet

1 1/2 oz. Canadian whisky
3/4 oz. vermouth rosso
Dashes Angostura bitters
Stemmed cherry

Stir well with ice a mixing glass. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with cherry.

Pendleton Canadian whisky. Wow… sweet is right! This drink mostly tastes like the vermouth rosso, which isn’t very surprising; Carpano Antica can be a real bully sometimes. Also, Canadian whisky doesn’t have much of a character of its own. Luckily, this will be the last time I’ll have to wonder why Mr. Schumann thought Canadian whisky was good for Manhattans (Dry and Perfect).

Tsjoch! (Frisian [South])

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on July 13, 2016 in Canadian whisky

 

Manhattan Perfect

Manhattan Perfect

Manhattan Perfect

September 10, 2015 – The Republic Steakhouse

Manhattan Perfect

1 1/2 oz. Canadian whisky
1/4 oz. dry vermouth
1/4 oz. vermouth rosso
Dashes of Angostura bitters
Stemmed cherry

Stir well with ice in a mixing glass. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with the cherry.

Pendleton Canadian whisky, Carpano Antica vermouth rosso, Dolin dry vermouth. As with the Manhattan Dry, I still have trouble calling this a Manhattan without some other designation… Canadian Manhattan, Moose Manhattan, Volstead Manhattan… something other than just Manhattan. It certainly follows the liquor/vermouth/bitters formula, so I’ll go with it. This version is lighter than one made with rye or Bourbon, with good bitterness from the vermouths and just a slight fruity sweetness.

 saluti! (Sicilian)

 
1 Comment

Posted by on March 12, 2016 in Canadian whisky

 

Ohio

Ohio

Ohio

September 25, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Ohio
3/4 oz. vermouth rosso
3/4 oz. Canadian whisky
Dash triple sec
Dashes Angostura bitters
Champagne

Stir first four ingredients with ice in a mixing glass. Strain into a Champagne flute and fill with Champagne.

Pendleton Canadian whisky, Carpano Antica vermouth rosso, and Gruet Brut sparkling white wine. After the success I had with the Manhattan Dry, I thought I’d try another Canadian cocktail. The Ohio was a bit on the sweet side, but not cloyingly so, and it had the usual muskiness from the wine. The real pleasing note was, of course, the Carpano Antica, which came through very clearly. I really liked this, and will probably order it again.

Pholo e ntle! (Tswana)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on October 2, 2014 in Canadian whisky, Champagne

 

Manhattan Dry

Manhattan Dry

Manhattan Dry

September 25, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Manhattan Dry
1 1/2 oz. Canadian whisky
3/4 oz. dry vermouth
Dashes Angostura bitters
Lemon peel

Stir well with ice in a mixing glass. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass and add lemon twist.

First, let me say that I was a bit shocked when I first saw this recipe for a Manhattan. I know Manhattans… I’ve had a lot of them… and not once did I hear of one being made with Canadian whisky. Not that there’s anything wrong with Canadian whisky, I just never thought there was a whole lot to it. Canadian whisky does not have the same rigorous standards that other liquors are made under (I blame Prohibition), so there can be coloring added, flavors, other adjucts… what have you. It just didn’t interest me, I guess. I certainly didn’t think it belonged in a Manhattan!

This cocktail was made with 40 Creek and Dolin dry vermouth. Turns out that this was a delightful drink! I couldn’t call it a Manhattan, but it was very tasty. Light, with a slight vanilla warmth. The lemon twist added a nice bright touch with just a little bitterness. An easy-to-drink Manhattan.

Båetieh bööresth! (Southern Sámi)

 
2 Comments

Posted by on October 2, 2014 in Canadian whisky

 

Scofflaw

Scofflaw

Scofflaw

July 17, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Scofflaw
1/4 oz.lemon juice
Dash grenadine
1 oz. dry vermouth
1 oz. Canadian whisky
Dash orange bitters

Stir over ice in a mixing glass. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Forty Creek Canadian whisky and Dolin dry vermouth. This was a little flat, but not terrible. The whisky made it pretty smooth; not a lot of bite, but that seems to be a defining characteristic of Canadian whisky. Strangely enough, the tiny bit of orange bitters was what came through the most.

Most Canadian whiskies are blended multigrain liquors containing a large percentage of corn spirits, and are typically lighter and smoother than other whisky styles. Several hundred years ago, when Canadian distillers began adding small amounts of highly flavourful rye grain to their mashes, people began demanding this new rye-flavored whisky, referring to it simply as “rye.” Today, as for the past two centuries, the terms “rye whisky” and “Canadian whisky” are used interchangeably in Canada and refer to exactly the same product.

Cheers, eh! (Canadian)

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on August 6, 2014 in Canadian whisky