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Category Archives: Cognac

I.B.U.

I.B.U.

I.B.U.

May 19, 2016 – The Republic Steakhouse

I.B.U.

3/4 oz. Cognac
3/4 oz. orange juicd
1/4 oz. apricot brandy
Champagne

Shake first three ingredients in a shaker with ice. Strain into a Champagne flute and fill with Champagne.

Courvoisier Cognac, Gruet sparkling white wine. This is a light, summery drink that is a bit on the sweet side. Like a Mimosa that’s heavy on the Champagne but at the same time a little kicky from the Cognac

Ahóá! (Navajo)

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Posted by on January 28, 2017 in Champagne, Cognac

 

Pierre Collins

Pierre Collins

Pierre Collins

March 26, 2015 – The Republic Steakhouse

Pierre Collins 

3/4 to 1 oz. lemon juice
1/4 to 3/4 oz. sugar syrup
2 oz. Cognac
Soda

Stir first three ingredients well with ice in a collins glass. Fill with soda.

Remy Martin VS Cognac. As with his brothers that I’ve sampled (Sandy, the Colonel, and Mike), Pierre Collins is a good, solid cocktail that is always pleasing and refreshing. A perfect balance between tart and sweet with the Cognac’s warm fruitiness shining through.

Şerefe! (to honor) (Turkish)

 
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Posted by on May 20, 2015 in Cognac

 

Ritz

Ritz

Ritz

July 10, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Ritz
3/4 oz. orange juice
3/4 oz. Cognac
1/4 oz. Cointreau
Champagne

Shake first three ingredients with ice in a shaker. Strain into a champagne flute and carefully fill with Champagne.

This was Ryan’s pick out of the book. Courvoisier VS (maybe VSOP? I don’t remember) Cognac, and Gruet sparkling white wine. The best way to describe this drink is that it is a SERIOUS Mimosa (just orange juice and Champers). The Cognac gives it some added warmth and oomph, while the Cointreau boosts the orange flavor and adds a little sweetness, although over all this is not a sweet drink. I wouldn’t have a lot of these at brunch, but one or two would make it fun.

Ma ixpāntzinco (Nahuatl)

 
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Posted by on July 16, 2014 in Champagne, Cognac

 

Prince of Wales

Prince of Wales

Prince of Wales

June 6, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Prince of Wales
1 sugar cube
Dashes of Angostura bitters
3/4 oz. Cognac
Orange wedge
Stemmed cherry
Champagne
1/4 oz. Bénédictine

Place sugar cube into a small highball glass (originally a silver glass) and saturate with bitters. Add ice cube and pour in Cognac. Add orange wedge and cherry. Fill with Champagne and gradually pour in Bénédictine.

Gruet sparkling white wine, Courvoisier V.S.O.P. (or maybe V.S.? I don’t remember), and lovely Bénédictine. Okay… Bénédictine was a partial theme for the evening, apparently. Although the Brooklyn was very hard to beat, I think this one did it.The mixture of ingredients do interesting things together. As usual, I took a good sniff before sipping. I immediately had an impression of Christmas. Hints of warm spices like cinnamon and nutmeg mixed with the scent of orange. A sip confirmed the spice notes along with the slightly winey, tart Gruet. This drink is an exception to an apparent rule that Ryan and I are finding to be in play: the cooler sounding the name of a cocktail is (Black & Fall, Tricontinental, Alexander’s Sister), the more boring or downright awful it is. The Prince of Wales is a cool sounding drink that is actually very good.

Bénédictine is an herbal liqueur beverage developed by Alexandre Le Grand in the 19th century and produced in France. It is claimed that at the Benedictine monks at the Abbey of Fécamp in Normandy had developed a medicinal aromatic herbal beverage which was produced until the abbey’s devastation during the French Revolution, but in fact Alexandre Le Grand invented the recipe himself, helped by a local chemist; he told this story to connect the liqueur with the city history to increase sales.

Uz veselību! (Latvian)

 
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Posted by on June 9, 2014 in Champagne, Cognac

 

Mike Collins

Mike Collins

Mike Collins

April 25, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Mike Collins
3/4 to 1 oz. lemon juice
1/4 ti 3/4 oz. simple syrup
2 oz. Irish whiskey
Soda
Stemmed cherry
Lemon

Stir first three ingredients over ice in a collins glass. Fill with soda and garnish with cherry and lemon slice.

Again, I asked for Red Breast Irish whiskey. The first sip made me feel like I was sitting in my back yard on a warm evening after work. It is infinitely sippable. Not too sweet, not too tart, and slightly fizzy.

Most people have heard of the most popular of the many cousins of the collins clan, the Tom Collins, which is made with gin. With the exception of the Rum Collins, each liquor variation has an appropriate moniker: Pedro, Captain, Sandy, Pepito… and so on. I’m looking forward to making all of their acquaintances.

Saúde! (Galician)

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2014 in Absinthe, Calvados, Cognac, Cointreau

 

Tipperary

Tipperary

Tipperary

April 25, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Tipperary
3/4 oz. vermouth bianco
1/4 oz. green Chartreuse
1 oz. Irish whiskey

Stir over ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Red Breast Irish whiskey… so far my favorite Irish whiskey… and Lillet Blanc. The Lillet, with its clean dry herbals and the Chartreuse with its sweeter florals combined to take off what little edge there was to the whiskey, in a good way. Chris let me taste the green and yellow versions of Chartreuse (see the entry for the Alaska) side by side. Although both have a similar “base” taste, the green is much more complex. I preferred the green, myself.

Lillet, strictly speaking, is not a vermouth, but an aperitif tonic wine made from a blend of Bordeaux wines, liqueurs of sweet and bitter orange peels, and the “tonic” requisite quinine. Here’s a bit of trivia… the original formulation of Lillet Blanc, Kina Lillet, is the preferred drink of Hannibal Lecter.

Sünhäid! (Frisian [North])

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2014 in Absinthe, Calvados, Cognac, Cointreau

 

Americano

Americano

Americano

April 25, 2014 – The Republic Steakhouse

Americano
1 oz. Campari
1 oz. vermouth rosso (or other vermouth)
Lemon and orange twists

Pour over ice into an aperitif glass and garnish with lemon and orange twists. (May be filled with some club soda.)

I took a sip of this first without the soda. Not bad, but definitely better with the soda. Campari has great cherry and grapefruit notes with some pleasantly bitter undertones. The vermouth rosso feathers in with complimentary stone fruit and floral flavors. I found the drink to be just a bit too sweet for my taste, but not unpleasant at all.

The Americano cocktail has a great history behind it. Originally created by Italian Gaspare Campari in the 1860s and served at his eponymous Caffè Campari, the drink was originally known as the “Milano-Torino”; Campari is from Milan and Cinzano, the vermouth, is from Torino. Popular belief has the name change occurring in the early 1900s when the Italians noticed a surge in Americans who enjoyed the drink.

The Americano is also the first drink ordered by that iconic cocktail drinker, James Bond, in Casino Royale, the first of the series. In a later novel, Bond orders the drink in a café and suggests that “in cafés you have to drink the least offensive of the musical comedy drinks that go with them.”  Musical comedy drinks… ha!

It was great to have my parents join us tonight! They both ordered an Americano and enjoyed it.

Živjeli!! (Bosnian)

 
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Posted by on April 29, 2014 in Absinthe, Calvados, Cognac, Cointreau